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View Full Version : What not to put in my portfolio?


milkcarton
20-08-2003, 09:18 PM
Alright guys, here is an exciting topic. You know you see it all the time, the stuff that makes your crinch and go... "WHY???" "HOOWWW could anybody think that is a good idea??" *ditch portfolio into trash*

I would say porn. There is a difference between nudes and porn. I'm talking about porn. There are people who think that's a good idea.

Armitage Shanks
21-08-2003, 01:51 AM
Try to avoid:

- Space ship taking off from space hangar.
- Big breasted barbarian babe with sword.
- Default animation cycles or free pre-packaged mocap anims.

milkcarton
21-08-2003, 06:32 PM
Try to avoid:

- your rendition of some already famous character, basically fan-art. I dont' know how much better you think you can do a DOA girl.. please keep it to yourself.

- Unnecesarily comparing your work to better ones. I knew a character modeler who would put a picture reference of who he was tryign to model right against his creation. It was a good model, however, putting a photo reference right next to it is like flaunting all its flaws.

- cramming 15 pictures into one page. The art needs space. People want to see big pictures. Select fewer ones but only put one or two on one page, and BIG.

Evil-E
21-08-2003, 06:34 PM
Give each image as much space as possible. If you crowd a bunch of images onto one page it makes it look like you're trying to hide your work.

Also, describe the image succinctly. If it's a pencil drawing, say that. If it was modelled in Maya say that as well. Also inlcude poly count and number of textures used.

Do not add personal commentary. If you really liked something that's great but it makes you appear unprofessional. Similarly, if you had a difficult time with a model don't mention that, it will sound like you are complaining about your work. (The kiss of death to any potential employer)

Don't try to "Art up" your resume or portfolio. Adding graphics or fancy borders only serve to annoy an HR person. Let your artwork speak for itself, if you put that crap in, you are effectively taking the spotlight away from your work.

Hope that helps,

:evil: -E

Prof. Shminky
21-08-2003, 07:25 PM
Don't put a big poo in your portfolio. To open up someone's work folder and find a huge, kingly turd staring back at you would certainly make me think twice about hiring that person.

ChibiRobusuta
21-08-2003, 07:51 PM
Ahhhh, Shminky. Always able to cause a laugh.

You're the shminkiest!

milkcarton
21-08-2003, 08:16 PM
Actually, yeah. Some people do do that... in a way.

DON'T put work that you are not proud of in your portfolio.
It's better to have a short and sweet porfolio than 30 pages full of subpar... poo..

There is a lesson to be learned here. :)

NoOneImportant
21-08-2003, 09:32 PM
Someone else's work.

It might sound like stating the obvious, but it happens way too much.

Prof. Shminky
22-08-2003, 12:18 AM
Ahhhh, Shminky. Always able to cause a laugh.

You're the shminkiest!

Scary that you use that phrase.

Armitage Shanks
22-08-2003, 04:34 AM
Don't try to "Art up" your resume or portfolio. Adding graphics or fancy borders only serve to annoy an HR person. Let your artwork speak for itself, if you put that crap in, you are effectively taking the spotlight away from your work.

Very very good point!
I've been confronted with some terrible illegible resumes from people that thought making their resume look like a piece of art would win them favours.
Less is more!

Your resume should be black words on white paper only.
Your work should be as simple and accessible as possible. No fancy page layouts that destroy the actual images themselves. Especially true if you're going for a more technical job (ie. modeller or rigger or whatever). What is important is that you show how well you do your art, not how shiny you can make your portfolio look.

milkcarton
14-10-2003, 10:25 PM
I don't want the critique of individual portfolios to get buried in this thread so I Cartoonfox's request into its own separate new thread. :)

andyo
21-11-2003, 09:35 AM
Try and avoid walk cycle animations, dull architecture (such a a table in an office), items that can be found in an argos catalogue(watches, lamps etc...).

It is best to show variety over quantity. Instead of concentrating on a single lengthy short movie, focus on producing a variety of smaller pieces.

A short list of quality 'never fail' folio work would be;


Animation:
- 3 or 4 interesting animations of a simple character in an empty room with just a maximum of a few props. To add extra variety vary the character from 2 and 4 legs.
- 1 short lip synced face animation. Say, no more than 10 seconds.

Models:
2 or 3 Interesting head models showing a variety of styles. Say, fantasy, cartoon and sci-fi.
2 or 3 Environments small, contained environments in a variety of styles ranging, again, from fantast, cartoon and sci-fi. If you have the technology to hand, present these as small executable files in anyone can run and walk about them.
2 or 3 figure models ranging in style and poly count. You may wish to produce these models and use the heads for your head model folio work.

Misc:
- Textures! This is an area of art skill that is, quite frequently, ignored in portfolio work. This is daft as texture work is a respected skill in the industry and, if your good at them, you really want to be showing them off.
- Traditional artwork. In this world of computers, traditional artwork is still required as a skill so build a folio containing a small collection of your best work. Avoid anything abstract. This is, afterall, an illustration industry.
- 2D computer work. Photoshop, Deluxe paint. Basically anything you've produced on your computer that isn't 3d. Avoid including anything bland that doesn't reflect your art skills, such as, advert banners, icons etc...

Hope this helps. I`ve been in this industry for nearly 15 years and I`ve seen a wide variety of portfolios so I hope this is an accurate list for you to work from.

andyo
21-11-2003, 09:35 AM
Try and avoid walk cycle animations, dull architecture (such a a table in an office), items that can be found in an argos catalogue(watches, lamps etc...).

It is best to show variety over quantity. Instead of concentrating on a single lengthy short movie, focus on producing a variety of smaller pieces.

A short list of quality 'never fail' folio work would be;


Animation:
- 3 or 4 interesting animations of a simple character in an empty room with just a maximum of a few props. To add extra variety vary the character from 2 and 4 legs.
- 1 short lip synced face animation. Say, no more than 10 seconds.

Models:
2 or 3 Interesting head models showing a variety of styles. Say, fantasy, cartoon and sci-fi.
2 or 3 Environments small, contained environments in a variety of styles ranging, again, from fantast, cartoon and sci-fi. If you have the technology to hand, present these as small executable files in anyone can run and walk about them.
2 or 3 figure models ranging in style and poly count. You may wish to produce these models and use the heads for your head model folio work.

Misc:
- Textures! This is an area of art skill that is, quite frequently, ignored in portfolio work. This is daft as texture work is a respected skill in the industry and, if your good at them, you really want to be showing them off.
- Traditional artwork. In this world of computers, traditional artwork is still required as a skill so build a folio containing a small collection of your best work. Avoid anything abstract. This is, afterall, an illustration industry.
- 2D computer work. Photoshop, Deluxe paint. Basically anything you've produced on your computer that isn't 3d. Avoid including anything bland that doesn't reflect your art skills, such as, advert banners, icons etc...

Hope this helps. I`ve been in this industry for nearly 15 years and I`ve seen a wide variety of portfolios so I hope this is an accurate list for you to work from.

lloyd mangram
25-11-2003, 10:18 PM
Right, off the top of my head and in no particular order:

Never put anything in that you feel you need to make an excuse for, eg, "I dont like this bit but I was running short of time"- that sounds incredibly weak. Equally though, it's important to identify what you are weakest at, since that's one of the questions that might be asked during the interview.

Don't pack your portfolio with just one style of imagery- manga stuff is just incredibly prolific in the portfolios I see, and it's mostly worthless since it's copied from already stylised work- a bit like aspiring comic strip artists copying Jack Kirby or Jim Lee, you end up with an inbred look, and the feeling that the artist has never actually drawn a real person, just someone elses idea of a person. In fact, I can't remember offering an interview to anyone with a mostly manga portfolio- of course, other companies may be looking for just that.

Dont put multiple versions of one piece in your showreel- I once saw about 30 minutes of footage of a car pulling into a drive taken from different angles, diff lighting setups etc. The actual content was about 30 seconds, tops. Equally don't just shove every model you've ever made into your portfolio. (One guy actually had a plank of wood included in his portfolio, it wasn't even chamfered...) This shows that not only are you a boring bastard, but also that you lack critical thinking and judgement.

If you stick in some standard game imagery, a dinosaur for example, then try and juxtapose it with something a bit more quirky or original. I'd much rather see an animation of a dinosaur thrashing around in a supermarket than fighting some axe wielding hero, f'rinstance. Apart from anything else it shows you can model real environments as well as fantasy animals!

...Good animal meshes/ animations are always good too

humour, especially in animation, is very tough to do well. If you're good at this, chances are you'll be good at most other animations.

Dont try and impress with technical jargon in an interview. It won't work.

Don't steal artwork-if you have to do this you're not good enough. Sorry.
Also, if some of your artwork contains other peoples work (say you did the animation on anothers model) I'd like to know before you turn up for the interview. So credit when you're using work other than your own.

Be honest with yourself- Is your artwork of an equal standard to at least some of the work out there?

Confidence in yourself is fine but dont *tell* me your work looks good on your CV... I'll be the judge of that!

lloyd mangram
25-11-2003, 10:18 PM
Right, off the top of my head and in no particular order:

Never put anything in that you feel you need to make an excuse for, eg, "I dont like this bit but I was running short of time"- that sounds incredibly weak. Equally though, it's important to identify what you are weakest at, since that's one of the questions that might be asked during the interview.

Don't pack your portfolio with just one style of imagery- manga stuff is just incredibly prolific in the portfolios I see, and it's mostly worthless since it's copied from already stylised work- a bit like aspiring comic strip artists copying Jack Kirby or Jim Lee, you end up with an inbred look, and the feeling that the artist has never actually drawn a real person, just someone elses idea of a person. In fact, I can't remember offering an interview to anyone with a mostly manga portfolio- of course, other companies may be looking for just that.

Dont put multiple versions of one piece in your showreel- I once saw about 30 minutes of footage of a car pulling into a drive taken from different angles, diff lighting setups etc. The actual content was about 30 seconds, tops. Equally don't just shove every model you've ever made into your portfolio. (One guy actually had a plank of wood included in his portfolio, it wasn't even chamfered...) This shows that not only are you a boring bastard, but also that you lack critical thinking and judgement.

If you stick in some standard game imagery, a dinosaur for example, then try and juxtapose it with something a bit more quirky or original. I'd much rather see an animation of a dinosaur thrashing around in a supermarket than fighting some axe wielding hero, f'rinstance. Apart from anything else it shows you can model real environments as well as fantasy animals!

...Good animal meshes/ animations are always good too

humour, especially in animation, is very tough to do well. If you're good at this, chances are you'll be good at most other animations.

Dont try and impress with technical jargon in an interview. It won't work.

Don't steal artwork-if you have to do this you're not good enough. Sorry.
Also, if some of your artwork contains other peoples work (say you did the animation on anothers model) I'd like to know before you turn up for the interview. So credit when you're using work other than your own.

Be honest with yourself- Is your artwork of an equal standard to at least some of the work out there?

Confidence in yourself is fine but dont *tell* me your work looks good on your CV... I'll be the judge of that!

Hagac
26-11-2003, 08:53 AM
Thanks for the replies guys, this is a great post.

Hagac
26-11-2003, 08:53 AM
Thanks for the replies guys, this is a great post.

crazymoogle
08-01-2004, 06:19 PM
Your demo-reel can never be too short.

Well, okay, if its not breaking 30 seconds that would indicate some problems, but no matter how many times I go to lecture about it, students still feel they need to tell a story or otherwise show 2+ minutes of CG, when really most of it is ugly and needs to be cut.

If its so-so, it needs to be cut.

If its good but not great, polish or cut it.

Take as much criticism as you can find and tweak it again.

The one thing I try to tell CG students who are demo-reel planning is to think of a few scenes and polish the hell out of them. It may seem counterintuitive to the time-crunch nature of the industry, but showing 3 super-well animated short scenes that you spent 3 months polishing still better represents you than 2-5 minutes of first try scenes with no critical commentary.

(omitting the horror stories of people submitting tapes labelled with nothing more than a ripped piece of packing tape)

squarepusher
20-01-2004, 04:12 PM
Someone else's work.

It might sound like stating the obvious, but it happens way too much.


It has happed like 3 three times on a large scale in the last 6 months.
you will be found out and you will be hanged.
don't do it.

kandyman
30-07-2004, 01:38 PM
-crap
Everyone produces crap now and then (I know I do), but if you put it in your demo, I know that you don't recognize it. I've hired people I've seen only 5 images and a couple of models from.

-too much
Some people get hundreds of applications per week during busy periods (I know I do:) and they simply don't have the time to look at tons of similar pics.

-DVDs with a creative flash menu
Instant trashcan transfer

-Irrelevant material
Don't send 47 cartoony characters if the job opening is for realistic humans...

I'll post more after I've gone trough the next 20 CDs on my desk :)

-Marin

fiendishmonotreme
12-11-2004, 03:10 AM
From looking through scads of resumes from artists and from hearing feedback about them from our artists ALONE, I can tell you these wee basics:

* For God's sake LABEL YOUR SHIT. Put your name, the position you're aiming for, your phone number, e-mail, and street address (if it can fit) on EVERYTHING. CDs, tapes, everything. You'd be surprised how annoying this can be. I can tell you that we got literal trash bags full of resumes and such from Siggraph, and things get separated - labels help a LOT.

* cough up the extra $0.50 for better packaging or whatever. Jewel cases for CDs can shatter (plastic DVD cases are stronger, and you can pick them up FOR FREE at your local Blockbuster if you go in and nicely ask them if they have any extras - same for tape cases), and tapes easily slip out of paper cases. Papers can bend and fold if you put them in crappy envelopes or folders. You don't have to try and wow possible employers with how badass your folder is - just give them something that keeps your stuff from breaking.

* Please try to keep everything together. In sorting through those trash bags, I had to chase down countless tapes and CDs and DVDs that got separated from their resumes. The thoughtful people who put everything in a well-organized plastic folder-bag-thing... man, I wanted to give them a big sloppy french-kiss in thanks. That statement aside, organization might not get you hired, but it's definitely a plus, and at a base level, it ensures that all your crap will get there in one piece.

Now. All the other professional stuff? Our artists echo that. Try to do:
- good quality low-poly models. A lot of polys make things look nice, and make things go sloooooooooooooow. If you can make something look really awesome with a tiny amount of polys, you can practically write your own meal ticket. Or so I've heard ::grin::
- once again, don't put crap in there. If you're not 100% sure that what you're featuring is something you'd want to be represented by, just don't put it in there. Imagine that you're only going to be judged on ONE THING you put in there - you should feel that confident about all your material
- don't rush yourself. There's not going to be a universal shut-down of hiring artists. Take the time you need to feel really good about your portfolio. Don't take forever to get your ducks in a row, but don't rush yourself to an unsatisfying conclusion.
- remember that this is a DAMMED TOUGH FIELD, and even the most talented can take years to break in to the business. Not getting in doesn't mean you suck. I mean, you still might, but don't automatically assume this is the case. And no matter what happens, take failure gracefully.
- practice all the time, and bug everyone you can for feedback.

That's my limited knowledge. Best of luck to all.

speedingpullet
08-04-2005, 02:39 PM
Hello chaps

I once again find myself wandering towards the World of Work.
I feel the need to pick some highly experienced brains, especially on the subject of what format most employers like to see....

For the CD, normally I create a simple Flash file (*.swf) of the actual works , with a simple 'button' menu linking larger (or moving) files of the work from a main menu.
Nothing fancy-schmancy, simple point-and-click, no sound files or flashing graphics.
My resume is is a Word document linked to the main menu, and is already formatted for immediate printing, in simple black and white, using a standard font like Ariel or Times Roman.

Would you, as employers, find this OK? I've heard that some of you don't like Flash, so are there any other formats that you like?

Any comments or suggestions gratefully received

Armitage Shanks
08-04-2005, 03:03 PM
I'd advise against any kind of front-end for your portfolio.
JPEGs for images (double-click and hey presto!)
AVIs with a common compression codec (like Microsoft Video 1 or something) for moving stuff.
Resume in Word and/or TXT format.
All neatly categorized in aptly named folders
If you want to give explanations or comments with certain works, either a TXT file in the same folder or some non-obtrusive but easily readable text in the image itself.

Though it all sounds cool to have a front-end presentation, even a simple non-flashy one, there will be one or two people that will get annoyed by it.
Aim your portfolio at the lowest common donominator (the producer with zero technical ability :wink: )

Just my thoughts though.

speedingpullet
08-04-2005, 07:47 PM
Many thanks for that, Armitage :D

I will do as you say, and provide not only a Flash file but a simple folder system with the work in, for the hard of hearing.

You are right, of course, nothing to do with computers can ever be too simple.

milkcarton
09-04-2005, 12:13 AM
I entirely agree with Armitage.

Even if any UI is really cool, if it takes me more than 2 sec to bypass it, it will get me annoyed and all the work that comes forth afterwards will unforunately be clouded by that.

Straightforward is the best. Unless you're trying to be a UI artist, which then still, function vs. form is a good balance to know. ;)

Personally, if you want to do anythign fancy, do it in a reel at least you're expecting to sit and watch something that's 3 min long, if you have nice transitions and stuff that's fine with me.

12-09-2005, 01:27 PM
- your rendition of some already famous character, basically fan-art. I dont' know how much better you think you can do a DOA girl.. please keep it to yourself.

Why? Shouldn't it be good to show that you can draw someone else's characters? There's a good chance that the artist will end up working on an existing license with existing characters.

I think, for example, that if you apply to Eidos, having a really good painting of Lara Croft can't hurt. Methinks.

Sprunghunt
12-09-2005, 11:36 PM
I think, for example, that if you apply to Eidos, having a really good painting of Lara Croft can't hurt. Methinks.

Eidos already has artists that can do really good paintings of lara croft. You want to show why they should hire you.

Also if you make something original it shows your design skills. Studios generally will not always be able to give direction to every one of their artists so there will always be a certain percentage of work which is left to the artist to under their own direction. So we want people who have skills in making art. Not just producing models and textures.

Plus most game developers are really, really, bored of looking at the properties they've worked on in the past. And you don't want to bore someone who's looking at your portfolio more than you have to.

14-09-2005, 03:13 PM
Well, they might have someone who can already paint Lara Croft very well, but they could also be looking for someone to replace that guy.

Obviously a porfolio full of Lara Crofts and Soul Calibur characters will be a very bad idea, but a mixture of known characters and original characters is probably the best (though I wouldn't know enough to recommend a specific balance between the two).

Also, a painting of Lara Croft could be an original take on the character. It doesn't have to be done by using a lightbox to trace existing Tomb Raider artwork. A good example will be an issue of Spider-Man written and drawn by Peter Bagg.

Unsurprised Jack
14-09-2005, 03:36 PM
Something that would put me off interviewing someone would be a portfolio with paintings made with the smeared blood of their first victim.

15-09-2005, 08:56 AM
I would be put off, probably, by a portfolio made entirely of drawings of poop.

...Drawn with real poop.

Mouseshadow
15-09-2005, 09:06 AM
I would be put off, probably, by a portfolio made entirely of drawings of poop.

...Drawn with real poop.

On the other hand, if they used the same logic with large breasted valkyrie warrior maidens... the line between wrong and right is often so subtle.

funkyalan
02-01-2006, 05:54 PM
Take a look at the artwork in some of the best games for inspiration and try to make something of your own that is at least that standard.

Also, think about what sort of games the company make and talior your work towards that, if you can.

in_a_nutshell
02-01-2006, 06:02 PM
On the other hand, if they used the same logic with large breasted valkyrie warrior maidens... the line between wrong and right is often so subtle.
But what if they're smeared in poop?

Unsurprised Jack
02-01-2006, 06:48 PM
On the other hand, if they used the same logic with large breasted valkyrie warrior maidens... the line between wrong and right is often so subtle.
But what if they're smeared in poop?

The success of the applicant will depend on how German the company is.

DownstrikeVox
06-01-2006, 07:10 PM
Thanks for all the info so far!

What about applying to grad school though? Do any of these rules or suggestions change?

I'm applying to go to grad school right now for an MS in digital imaging and design, and I'm putting my portfolio together right now. I've been sketching out a pretty slick web layout for my work, but is it bad to do that even if it's a very functional site that doesn't take TOO many clicks to get at everything? I figured the website for it could actually be part of the portfolio itself. Also, I'm including a wide variety of work, from 3d models to a partially done PC game to sound design. I'm guessing that in my case showing a wide variety of stuff is a lot more acceptable than if one were applying at a specific company for a specific job, right?

Chris Canfield
19-01-2006, 12:36 AM
Cut your portfolio down to eight images or one minute of video. Seriously. The person looking at your portfolio wants to believe that you're great, but is looking for any reason to toss your resume aside and pick up the next one. Give them just enough evidence to let them believe what they want to believe, but not so much that they can find fault.

Always leave them wanting more.

Nof
01-02-2006, 02:54 PM
1. Never send pictures/movies based on chrome spheres rolling over a checkerboard. Believe me or not, I got one last month. There was a lot of laughter over it in the office.

2. Never send renders of completed tutorial scenes. There is always someone who have seen it.

3. Don't use halo effects

4. Don't send sketches made on a feint under the desk at school time

5. Remember the article 1.

!Anaka
26-03-2006, 02:37 AM
I think you are right guys! :) (To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.)

SethSpaulding
08-05-2006, 09:44 PM
This is all great info for the aspiring game artist. I would add a couple of things:
1) On the topic of the Lara paintings: At a minimum make sure you are showing work that is relevant to the games industry. I see many student portfolios chock full of great anatomy studies and still lifes. That's all great and everything but show me that you can take that talent and pour it into something you love...hopefully games.

2) Treat your web portfolio the same way you would treat your resume, graphically and organizationally speaking. That is, the website is not a place to get artsy-craftsy or show off your "too-cool for text" UI design. Let me know where I'm going and get me there as fast as possible.

3) I'll say it again because it's still the number one mistake that artists make: Do not show mediocre work. How do you avoid doing this? Embrace the idea that you can't decide what's mediocre when it's your work and get a bunch of tough crits on your portfolio. Based on that info, cut your presentation down. Visit game art outsourcing sites. They usually display a variety of subjects and styles all with decent targets to shoot for when deciding if a particular piece of yours is up to industry-standard.

-Seth

Silvery
03-06-2006, 10:11 PM
If I see just one more "dwarf with massive hammer" in a portfolio I *will* be sick.

BrandomJR
29-08-2006, 05:05 AM
great :):) (To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.)

LadyHydralisk
06-09-2006, 10:22 PM
Seth, you give some really good pointers. On Conceptart.org (The outsourcing company Massive Black's website) they have a folder in the forum for critiquing portfolios. Would it be possible to do something like that here for students?

My portfolio is lacking any 3D art. I think it's really important to have both excellent traditional art skills along with the ability to translate it into 3D. Is that true for the most part, or do companies really shy away from people who have broad knowledge rather than focused knowledge? (Even if it is all good work)

Sheajar
10-09-2006, 10:44 AM
yes, i think so... :) (To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.)

bugger all
14-09-2006, 09:35 AM
Seth, you give some really good pointers. On Conceptart.org (The outsourcing company Massive Black's website) they have a folder in the forum for critiquing portfolios. Would it be possible to do something like that here for students?
)

Count me in as a supporter for this idea. Public section of TCE is fairly small, but it can be quite important for those loonies who want to get into the industry. I'm guessing it all boils down to diskspace and bandwidth .. Admins, 'ello? Any chance for this, or is this idea covered better in IGDA and CGTalk et al? CGTalk has a lot of userbase to gather commentary from, but most of them are those "woo woo! looks gr8!" -thumbuppers who have no insight on the gamedev requirements and whatever. At least here you would get straight and painful critique from the people in the know without all that extra cheese. Haven't hung around IGDA forums enough to know their take on this.

SethSpaulding
14-12-2006, 02:47 PM
I'd be happy take some time each week to look at portfolios. I can't promise perfect attendance, but my bet is that there are a lot of other industry QADs on CE.

bugger all
20-12-2006, 08:01 PM
I'd be happy take some time each week to look at portfolios. I can't promise perfect attendance, but my bet is that there are a lot of other industry QADs on CE.

As well. I'd be happy going over stuff and hopefully helping a bit.

Photon
23-12-2006, 02:21 AM
You may be pleased to know this is on the list for looking at once I have some more of the new site in place. For now, feel free to make posts in here, however as you say, its going to be (potentially) difficult hosting wise... does the whole thing have to be hosted?

LadyHydralisk
13-02-2007, 04:23 PM
Nice, you redid the site. I tried to post here a couple weeks ago but the site was down.

Anyways after I posted this a game company employee came over to Conceptart.org and posted a flurry of really informative posts. SO everybody is loving that over there. Meanwhile I'm training myself, seeing as how I found out the school I enrolled in is a diploma mill. I enrolled to learn 3D modelling and I found out the 3D modelling teacher's portfolio was scary. It's not much better elsewhere. All of my choices around here are bogus, too. They're accredited and more well regarded than the school I was in, but they teach little. I hear from my brother who is interested in programming for games that it's the same with learning code. All of the really good programmers can't get everything they need from many institutions of learning, like other professions can. Colleges are low-tech. :neutral:

Ugh, what a headache. I'm learning so much more from the internet now.

So, too bad, so sad I'm not in South Cali where all of the good schools are but what the hell, I know I can learn this stuff through self study on indie projects.

Anyways you're all talking about hosting portfolios but I host all of my own stuff, I was just thinking of remote-linking , you know, in a thread. I just didn't want to throw something like that on everyone without asking. There's lots of free hosting around for those without their own hosting. Anyways thanks for replying I got all distracted and stuff. \\:D/

bugger all
14-02-2007, 11:02 AM
Anyways you're all talking about hosting portfolios but I host all of my own stuff, I was just thinking of remote-linking , you know, in a thread. I just didn't want to throw something like that on everyone without asking. There's lots of free hosting around for those without their own hosting. Anyways thanks for replying I got all distracted and stuff. \\:D/

I believe the issue was indeed the thread stuff - should the images posted here be hosted on TCE as attachments or loaded from elsewhere.

Photon, any news on the matter? :)

sponge
03-03-2007, 12:39 AM
I say 'no' to 2 legged walker robots and 'no' to anybody who puts black and yellow danger stripes on anything, ever. But, that's just me.

Snipehunter
03-03-2007, 01:02 AM
I say 'no' to 2 legged walker robots and 'no' to anybody who puts black and yellow danger stripes on anything, ever. But, that's just me.

Even caution tape? :cool:

sponge
06-03-2007, 01:07 AM
Especially caution tape.

Jabberwocky
06-03-2007, 01:20 AM
You may be pleased to know this is on the list for looking at once I have some more of the new site in place. For now, feel free to make posts in here, however as you say, its going to be (potentially) difficult hosting wise... does the whole thing have to be hosted?

Why not just have a separate private section that's open to students who register? I'm sure there's plenty of people around here who'd enjoy posting among students, sharing their experience and more importantly, giving them a taste of the personalities in the industry ;) Just like we opened up the jobs section to recruiters.

I wouldn't worry about hosting any portfolios or other stuff - that's not what TCE is good at. There's thousands of file/image/video hosting sites out there for that. The rest can be made up by personal webpages. I know you guys are usually swamped by registration requests, it would probably help with a few more volunteers on board dedicated to overseeing student applications.

Put the word out (gamedev.net, etc - I'm sure superpig would be interested in helping :-P ), invite them all! Could be a blast :)

bugger all
06-03-2007, 11:40 AM
What he said!

RustyKnight
08-05-2007, 08:34 AM
OUTSTANDING!

This has been one of the most informative discussions on folios that I've read or seen!

Thank you all! :D

Bobz
08-05-2007, 01:08 PM
Anyways after I posted this a game company employee came over to Conceptart.org and posted a flurry of really informative posts. SO everybody is loving that over there. Meanwhile I'm training myself, seeing as how I found out the school I enrolled in is a diploma mill. I enrolled to learn 3D modelling and I found out the 3D modelling teacher's portfolio was scary. It's not much better elsewhere. All of my choices around here are bogus, too. They're accredited and more well regarded than the school I was in, but they teach little. I hear from my brother who is interested in programming for games that it's the same with learning code. All of the really good programmers can't get everything they need from many institutions of learning, like other professions can. Colleges are low-tech. :neutral:


Aye, the old adage of those who can, do, and those you can't teach, which is often unfair, does seem to be the case here in a lot of places, not all obviously though...but then again, it's a steady pay cheque, so can't blame anyone for it either.

As for hosting, check out coroflot and core77...okay more towards industrial and product design, but nice port folio hosting, and also a nice idea on how to lay things out etc so it still holds, and ID was my background.

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To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

kungpaomeatloaf
11-08-2007, 10:00 PM
As well. I'd be happy going over stuff and hopefully helping a bit.
This is a late reply to this thread, but the one thing to keep in mind is those of us in the industry have limited time to look at anything.

Always put your best stuff, and ONLY your best stuff. I usually allocate about a minute per resume and reel. If nothing jumps out then I move to the next one.

Eric Chadwick
30-04-2008, 04:12 PM
Tons of advice in here already, but here are a couple articles that might provide some more insight.

Jon's been around awhile, knows what he's talking about.
Your portfolio repels jobs (To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.)

Rick's also a veteran, his wiki has some great info.
How to Get Into and Survive the Gaming Industry (To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.)

feel_the _chaos
03-08-2009, 02:09 PM
Hi everyone,

I know this is quite an old subject but I was wondering if most of you or all of you can turn your attention to my portfolio.
I have just graduated university doing a game design course and looking for a job in 3D art, I have applied for a few jobs but I havenít had much success.
So Iím hoping you all can give me feedback and criticism good or bad on my portfolio.

My link is: To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Thank you all

parm
03-08-2009, 02:28 PM
I'd suggest not having it as one monolithic .swf that takes several minutes to load even over a moderately fast connection, especially when there's nothing in there that you couldn't do with a normal webpage.

Eric Chadwick
03-08-2009, 05:12 PM
Yup, you lost my eyeballs soon after you asked me to Please Wait.

read this (To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.)

Fontainne
04-08-2009, 11:13 PM
haven't seen these mentioned yet:

No Turntables - Seriously? is rotating around a static model the best way to show off your work? If it is a character, get it animated and off a turntable, if its a rigid model, shoot it from one or two angles and move on.

No Divinci Poses - as with turntables, if you've gone to the trouble of modeling your character in its default reference pose, rig it and animate it, or get a friend who's specializing in animation do to that. Nothing puts me off of a modelling portfolio more than Turn Tables and Divinci Poses.

Long Introduction screens - I need to know your name and contact info, but do I need to see it on screen for thirty seconds before and after your reel? tag that crap like a watermark across the entire video and be done with it.

If multiple people worked on a scene you end up showing in a reel, please identify what you actually worked on, or isolate your work away from everyone elses. If I see a big elobarote scene, fully lit, modelled, textured and animated and there is absolutely no indication that others worked on it, I'm going to be really upset if you make it to an interview to only find out you ran the mixer board when recording the audio for the scene, but your applying for a 3d modeller position. This equates to stealing others work and writing it off as your own, and is completely unacceptable, and would be an immediate dismissal from me. It's a good thing I don't review art candidates anymore.

feel_the _chaos
06-08-2009, 04:04 PM
I have taken advice from the few responses I got from my post earlier this week. I have today just published a new hopefully refined site. Not all of my work is published yet but I just hope Iím moving in the right direction now.

Thanks for your advice and please give more if itís still not quite there yet.

Prof. Shminky
05-02-2010, 07:39 PM
Don't put a big poo in your portfolio. To open up someone's work folder and find a huge, kingly turd staring back at you would certainly make me think twice about hiring that person.

Wow, I got thanked for a post I made 7 years ago...
Wicked cool.

More plz.

stimpy
08-02-2010, 12:00 PM
you should check out my artwork and do the complete polar opposite of what I do because I can't get a job for love nor money.

I think I might scrap everything I've done and just have a site with a 16x16 pixel animated GIF of masterchiefs head rotating round and round. I'll most likey have people queueing up to employ me once that fuckers on there.

sponge
17-03-2010, 07:14 PM
No shit music in your show reel, especially if it's some flash video monstrosity that doesn't allow me to turn off the sound.

I've been going through show reels this last few weeks and I've come to the conclusion that I don't want to listen to nu metal as I watch barbarian and space marine characters on turntables followed by camera fly throughs of shit brown, blood splattered spaceship corridors any more.

[-X

stimpy
15-04-2010, 02:13 PM
No shit music in your show reel, especially if it's some flash video monstrosity that doesn't allow me to turn off the sound. I've been going through show reels this last few weeks and I've come to the conclusion that I don't want to listen to nu metal as I watch barbarian and space marine characters on turntables followed by camera fly throughs of shit brown, blood splattered spaceship corridors any more. [-X

heh. You see, thats what employer always say. "i don't want to see a massive transexual space warrior with cats ears shooting a really uncharismatic alien in the face" but then I wonder what you do want to see...

What about if I made a kind of centor warrior queen with a motorised arm impaling a multi cocked cyborg warlord in the assholewith an electric speer. would that get me a job?

plaf
15-04-2010, 04:36 PM
haven't seen these mentioned yet:
No Turntables - Seriously? is rotating around a static model the best way to show off your work? If it is a character, get it animated and off a turntable, if its a rigid model, shoot it from one or two angles and move on.

No Divinci Poses - as with turntables, if you've gone to the trouble of modeling your character in its default reference pose, rig it and animate it, or get a friend who's specializing in animation do to that. Nothing puts me off of a modelling portfolio more than Turn Tables and Divinci Poses.


well.. if you're a modeller applying for a straight up modelling position, as opposed to a an all-round position, or a modeller/rigger position, I'm a little dubious about the whole 'you have to make it into an interesting illustration' attitude. IMO you're supposed to be able to see past that, and recognize the quality of the work.

obviously, the other side of that coin is that presentation is important :) I'm just saying, if I got a portfolio with static renders, and meshes in standard poses, if the work was good, I would be okay with that
(though obviously I would probably be MORE okay with the folio showing a gorgeously lit and posed character :) - so I guess I agree, d'oh!!!)

just my 2cents ..

IFW
30-04-2010, 03:21 PM
I was gonna suggest not putting in a load of hard core pornography and lots of bribe money... Then i figured it couldnt hurt.

sama.van
01-05-2010, 03:52 AM
Before to give a portfolio, it could be nice to show a preview of your work.

This is always difficult to create a folio when you start to have lot of content.

Then to catch people they could be interested about the style of my 3D for their game I always give the following pictures before the url of my complete folio :

samavan.com/3D/sama.van_Preview_C.png

The client understands in 5s if I have any chance for his offer.
After that if he wants to know more, he can simply access to my complete folio to catch the character he liked in the preview.