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View Full Version : I-Phone Developer Needed (Freelance)


robertjmccarthy
14-10-2008, 09:18 PM
I currently work as QA and Porting Manager for a Games Publisher as well as working as a 'Project Manager' within the games industry too.

I have a concept for an I-Phone (2.5g, 3g and touch) application that I want to get developed and publish.

The application will eventually be sold on the Apple Application Store within I-Tunes.

The application is simple, and should not take an experienced solo developer more than 30 days to develop (part - time) or a week (maximum - full time). This can be discussed if needed before bidding (once NDA signed).

I will need a developer to provide examples of work that they have already developed. The developer will also have to be registered as an Apple I-Phone Developer.

If this proves to be successful, then there will most probably be more development opportunities for the successful bidder.

There will be no fee paid for development. I will offer the successful bidder a 'revenue-share' of the profits made form selling the application (meaning this will probably suit someone looking for part-time work).

Any questions, please contact me.

Regards,

Jimmy Thicker
14-10-2008, 09:34 PM
How about you give me your car and we do a "revenue share"? If that goes well, I may have more opportunities for you.

Brian Beuken
14-10-2008, 10:16 PM
I currently work as QA and Porting Manager for a Games Publisher as well as working as a 'Project Manager' within the games industry too.

I have a concept for an I-Phone (2.5g, 3g and touch) application that I want to get developed and publish.

The application will eventually be sold on the Apple Application Store within I-Tunes.

The application is simple, and should not take an experienced solo developer more than 30 days to develop (part - time) or a week (maximum - full time). This can be discussed if needed before bidding (once NDA signed).

I will need a developer to provide examples of work that they have already developed. The developer will also have to be registered as an Apple I-Phone Developer.

If this proves to be successful, then there will most probably be more development opportunities for the successful bidder.

There will be no fee paid for development. I will offer the successful bidder a 'revenue-share' of the profits made form selling the application (meaning this will probably suit someone looking for part-time work).

Any questions, please contact me.

Regards,

ok I think you've misunderstood the concept of professional...as in we get PAID to do our work...try looking it up, and then consider this is a forum full of professional games developers, Please go find a desperate fanboy or stump up some cash!!

The Lynx Effect
14-10-2008, 10:25 PM
To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts. :rolleyes:

robertjmccarthy
14-10-2008, 10:39 PM
Obviously this was not the place to ask.

Sorry for wasting both our times.

The %age would have been a 40%-40% split (as 20% has been assigned to the artist), and at the rate that the apps sell (looking at latest figures gained from my current employment for their releases) that 'could' have been a good tidy profit.

Cheers anyway.

Brian Beuken
14-10-2008, 10:57 PM
40% of nothing, is ...erm carry the 1...add the remainder....erm nothing
We've all been there Robert and long since moved on from the work for nothing on this great idea that'll sell millions.
Maybe....often...they sell 10 copies and thats a waste of everyones effort.

Look its nothing personal...but we get this crap every single day...if you have a genuine idea and belive it can work. Pay for someone to do it and you'll get a good job done.

Floyd Patterson
23-10-2008, 11:33 AM
Amen to that.

I run a small club night with a friend of mine. We have two rock solid rules:

1/ Everyone gets paid, always, even if that means we make a loss. Flyer guy, girl taking money on the door, guest DJs, whatever.

2/ Everyone else gets paid before us - if there's nothing left for us, that's our problem. If there's loads left for us, lucky us.

This strikes me as the minimum ethical requirement for any business venture.

mrluisp
23-10-2008, 12:45 PM
I'm a bit surprised at the vehemence of the replies. Are you guys saying you would never take a job that pays on royalties? I'm genuinely curious here.

Sairon
23-10-2008, 01:08 PM
I'm a bit surprised at the vehemence of the replies. Are you guys saying you would never take a job that pays on royalties? I'm genuinely curious here.

I think the problem is that robert is seemingly bringing nothing to the table besides a game concept and wants someone to create it for free and share the earnings with him.

MrCranky
23-10-2008, 01:12 PM
Maybe, if and only if:
a) I was sold on the concept and properly believed it would sell and be profitable, even with a cynical hat on
b) It was treated as totally secondary to an actual paying gig. So it gets done in the downtime
c) I knew that the people involved were people I could work with, i.e. is actually going to move the project forward as best they can

But most likely b) and c) fight against each other. Even if I have enough free time to make serious progress on the project, the more people involved, the more likely it is that it will bottleneck on someone else, because no-one has actually got a real solid incentive to get the thing to completion.

Plus even if you put in a chunk of hard graft, you're still leaving control of the thing with the 'Project Manager' (and really, did that need it's own quotes?), with little guarantee that you'll actually see the thing get to market.

So really we're talking planetary alignment needed to get all of the things together to make an endeavour like this work. You don't get it by soliciting involvement from random people off internet forums. Maybe if you knew a programmer and artist personally, and got lucky with their free time. Maybe iPhone apps are trivially easy to get to market, in which case I don't see why you would need to solicit help from randoms anyway.

mrluisp
23-10-2008, 01:27 PM
I think the problem is that robert is seemingly bringing nothing to the table besides a game concept and wants someone to create it for free and share the earnings with him.
Right, I agree I didn't make it clear earlier, but I meant would you ever work for a royalty in the general case (not just in this particular example).

Sairon
23-10-2008, 01:52 PM
Right, I agree I didn't make it clear earlier, but I meant would you ever work for a royalty in the general case (not just in this particular example).

Depends on the deal, I would love to work for royalties, but it would have to be accompanied by other incentives.

Brian Beuken
26-10-2008, 02:03 PM
Right, I agree I didn't make it clear earlier, but I meant would you ever work for a royalty in the general case (not just in this particular example).

If it was fairly sure to sell, and after 25 years I have a fair idea of whats going to bomb just from the pitch, or if it was something I thought was a really very cool idea, sure I'd give a "little" time for free....But I have bills to pay, and I can't take 6 months or more working for free when the bills keep coming in. With projects these days taking so long to produce I just can't see that the wait and see what it makes model is even remotely viable now.

I've looked around from time to time for free projects to help out on and most have died a death, or in the case of one project I'm helping on, my time has been seriously limited. I'm involved in that project because I wanted to do some work on a high end PC game...will it make money? Doubt it, it might. But I trust the people on it so I dip in from time to time when work/money allows.

Further more, if, and I say IF in capitals, I were to take a punt on a commercial royalty deal I'd have to be 10000% confident in the people who were doing it with me, that limits the field to close personal friends or collegues I respect and trust, not someone who punts an ad in a free section of a pro game forum.